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SCAPIS Study

The aim of the Swedish CArdioPulmonary bioImage Study (SCAPIS) is to predict and prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD) and COPD. SCAPIS will provide a nationwide, open-access, population-based cohort for the study of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). SCAPIS will recruit and investigate 30,000 men and women aged 50 to 65 years with detailed imaging and functional analyses of the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems. The data is collected at six university hospitals in Sweden (Uppsala, Umeå, Linköping, Malmö/Lund, Gothenburg and Stockholm). Biobanked blood and DNA will be analysed in collaboration with SciLifeLab.

The risk factor patterns for myocardial infarction (MI), stroke and COPD have changed dramatically during the last two decades, from an environment with high levels of cholesterol, blood pressure and smoking, to a scenario dominated by obesity, hypertriglyceridemia and diabetes. The same era has seen an unparalleled development of imaging and proteomics/metabolomics/genomics (“-omics”) technologies. As a consequence, strategies for diagnosis and prevention of cardiopulmonary diseases developed just a few decades ago lack evidence and perhaps also relevance in today’s healthcare. These strategies have the potential to be dramatically improved by using recently developed advanced imaging techniques that allow us to directly image the disease process rather than relying on the limited information provided by indirect risk factors, and by using of recent developments in large-scale -omics techniques, facilitating the identification of new biomarkers and mechanisms for disease. The only way to bridge this knowledge gap is to assemble a new large cohort study including examinations using the most recent and most promising techniques.

SCAPIS Pilot Study

A feasibility study, the SCAPIS pilot study, was performed in Gothenburg from February to November 2012. A total of 1111 subjects were recruited and all aspects of the SCAPIS design were tested. The pilot trial showed that it is feasible to apply a very comprehensive phenotyping protocol without losing data quality or representability of the population. Subject selection in the pilot study differed from the main study thus the pilot study is considered as a stand-alone cohort. In the pilot study, subject recruitment wase stratified by socioeconomic resident areas.